Torture in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
 

Human Trafficking & Modern-day Slavery

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                 gvnet.com/humantrafficking/Honduras.htm

Republic of Honduras

Honduras, the second poorest country in Central America, has an extraordinarily unequal distribution of income and high unemployment. The economy relies heavily on a narrow range of exports, notably bananas and coffee, making it vulnerable to natural disasters and shifts in commodity prices; however, investments in the maquila and non-traditional export sectors are slowly diversifying the economy.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Description: Description: Honduras

Honduras is principally a source and transit country for women and children trafficked for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation. Honduran victims are typically lured by false job offers from rural areas to urban and tourist centers, such as Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, and the Bay Islands. Honduran women and children are trafficked to Guatemala, El Salvador, Mexico, Belize, and the United States for commercial sexual exploitation. Most foreign victims of commercial sexual exploitation in Honduras are from neighboring countries; some are economic migrants victimized en route to the United States. Additional trafficking concerns include reports of child sex tourism in the Bay Islands, and some criminal gangs’ forcing children to conduct street crime. - U.S. State Dept Trafficking in Persons Report, June, 2009  [full country report]

 

CAUTION:  The following links have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Honduras.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated or even false.  No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Easy prey for traffickers

Yampier Aguiar Durañona, Journalism student, Granma International, February 2, 2005

Click [here] to access the article.  Its URL is not displayed because of its length

[accessed 10 June 2013]

NO ONE CAN OR SHOULD SELL OUR CHILDREN - On July 23, 2004, Aguas Ocaña, Honduras’ first lady, announced that the government was preparing a lawsuit against the US organization Orphans Overseas for offering an Internet network selling Honduran children for $11,500 each. "No one can or should sell our children," she added.  In an interview with the national HRN radio station, Ocaña affirmed that in 2003 the government had rejected a request from the US organization to operate in the country because it did not meet the legal requirements.  "The company is now publicizing itself on the Internet as an adoption agency operating in Honduras and what it is offering is the sale of Honduran children," she stressed.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

Immigrant sisters admit charges in human trafficking

John P. Martin, Star-Ledger, August 04, 2006

www.alipac.us/f12/immigrant-sisters-admit-charges-human-trafficking-33642/

[accessed 21 April 2012]

Two Honduran sisters admitted yesterday that they helped smuggle dozens of illegal female immigrants -- some as young as 14 -- into the United States, then forced them to live together and work at North Jersey bars.

The admissions by Noris Elvira and Ana Luz Rosales-Martinez, during a federal court hearing in Trenton, brought to five the number of guilty pleas in what authorities say was a case of indentured servitude.

Under questioning from prosecutors, the women said they helped oversee dozens of illegal Hondurans who were forced to work six days a week and live in cramped Hudson County apartments until they could repay smuggling fees as high as $20,000.

The immigrants earned $5 an hour, plus tips, by dancing and drinking with male patrons at bars in Union City and Guttenberg. One ring member said the girls were encouraged to prostitute themselves; another said they were beaten if they ignored the house rules.

10 Indicted in International Human Smuggling Ring - Young Honduran Women Forced to Work in Hudson County Bars

Michael Drewniak, Public Affairs Office, U.S. Dept of Justice, U.S. Attorney, District of New Jersey, July 21, 2005

archives.uruguay.usembassy.gov/usaweb/paginas/471-00EN.shtml

[accessed 30 August 2011]

The women, mostly from rural, poor villages in Honduras – some as young as 14 – were recruited under the false promise of getting legitimate jobs as waitresses in restaurants in New Jersey. Once brought to Hudson County by way of a safe house in Houston, Texas, however, they were put to work at several bars owned by the ringleader and subject to physical and emotional abuse, according to the Indictment.

Smuggled Honduran Women May Be Allowed To Stay In U.S.

newsday.com, 10 February 2005 -- Source: www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--smuggledwomen0210feb10,0,251994,print.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey

Click [here] to access the article.  Its URL is not displayed because of its length

[accessed 14 July 2013]

But after delivering them to New Jersey, smugglers demanded fees as high as $20,000, then forced them to work off the debt by dancing with men in bars.

ABSTRACT - Nineteen women and girls from Honduras who were smuggled into the United States and forced to work in a bar may be permitted to stay in this country as protected victims of human trafficking, authorities said.

Easy prey for traffickers

Yampier Aguiar Durañona, Journalism student, Granma International, February 2, 2005

Click [here] to access the article.  Its URL is not displayed because of its length

[accessed 10 June 2013]

NO ONE CAN OR SHOULD SELL OUR CHILDREN - On July 23, 2004, Aguas Ocaña, Honduras’ first lady, announced that the government was preparing a lawsuit against the US organization Orphans Overseas for offering an Internet network selling Honduran children for $11,500 each. "No one can or should sell our children," she added.  In an interview with the national HRN radio station, Ocaña affirmed that in 2003 the government had rejected a request from the US organization to operate in the country because it did not meet the legal requirements.  "The company is now publicizing itself on the Internet as an adoption agency operating in Honduras and what it is offering is the sale of Honduran children," she stressed.

Focus on Children - Child Soldiers

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of International Labor Affairs, International Child Labor Program, Sept 2002

www.unicef.org/graca/kidsoldi.htm

[accessed 9 September 2014]

"At the age of 13, I joined the student movement. I had a dream to contribute to make things change, so that children would not be hungry….Later I joined the armed struggle. I had all the inexperience and the fears of a little girl. I found out that girls were obliged to have sexual relations to alleviate the sadness of the combatants. And who alleviated our sadness after going with someone we hardly knew?…There is a great pain in my being when I recall all these things….In spite of my commitment, they abused me, they trampled my human dignity. And above all, they did not understand that I was a child and that I had rights." - From a Honduras case study, cited in United Nations, Impact of Armed Conflict on Children: Special Concerns, 1998.

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/honduras.htm

[accessed 8 February 2011]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - Honduras serves as a source and transit country for girls trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.  Honduran girls are trafficked internally and to the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and other Central American countries for the purpose of prostitution.  Children have also been reportedly trafficked to Canada for prostitution and the sale of drugs.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61732.htm

[accessed 8 February 2011]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS – Women and children were trafficked into Guatemala and also internally, most often from rural to urban settings. The commercial sexual exploitation of children was a serious problem. As of October Casa Alianza estimated that there were approximately 10 thousand children who were victims of some form of commercial sexual exploitation. The Office of the Special Prosecutor for Children conducted 30 operations jointly with the police, the Honduran Institute for Children and the Family (IHNFA), judges, and Casa Alianza, to rescue victims and arrest and prosecute those responsible for these victims' exploitation.

Most trafficking victims were young women and girls, who were trafficked to Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Mexico, the United States, and Canada for sexual and labor exploitation. Traffickers were reportedly locals as well as Guatemalan, Mexican, and in some cases Chinese or Taiwanese nationals. In a majority of cases, traffickers posed as coyotes (alien smugglers), claiming to facilitate border crossings and help immigrants enter other countries in Central America, Mexico or the US. In some cases victims were promised lucrative jobs but instead were forced into commercial sexual exploitation, drug trafficking, or debt bondage.

Freedom House Country Report - Political Rights: 3   Civil Liberties: 3   Status: Partly Free

2009 Edition

www.freedomhouse.org/report/freedom-world/2009/honduras

[accessed 26 June 2012]

Human Rights Overview

Human Rights Watch

www.hrw.org/americas/honduras

[accessed 8 February 2011]

U.S. Library of Congress - Country Study

Library of Congress Call Number F1503 .H75 1995

lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/hntoc.html

[accessed 8 February 2011]

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Torture in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Honduras]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Honduras]  [other countries]