Torture in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
 

Child Prostitution

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                              gvnet.com/childprostitution/Tonga.htm

Kingdom of Tonga

Tonga has a small, open, South Pacific island economy. It has a narrow export base in agricultural goods. Squash, vanilla beans, and yams are the main crops. Agricultural exports, including fish, make up two-thirds of total exports.

Tonga has a reasonably sound basic infrastructure and well developed social services. High unemployment among the young, a continuing upturn in inflation, pressures for democratic reform, and rising civil service expenditures are major issues facing the government.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Tonga

CAUTION:  The following links and accompanying text have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Tonga.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated, misleading or even false.   No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** ARCHIVES ***

The Department of Labor’s 2006 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor [PDF]

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2007

www.dol.gov/ilab/programs/ocft/PDF/2006OCFTreport.pdf

[accessed 31 December 2010]

[page 420]  INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - There are no reports of child labor existing in the formal or informal economy. During 2006, there were increased reports of workers on foreign fishing vessels soliciting underage girls for prostitution.

CHILD LABOR LAWS AND ENFORCEMENT - Tonga does not have legislation setting the minimum age for work. The law prohibits slavery, which can be interpreted to include forced or bonded labor. The owning and/or operating of a brothel, pimping, and soliciting in a public place are all prohibited by the law. Penalties for offenses range from imprisonment from 6 months to 2 years. The law also prohibits any person from assaulting a child in an indecent manner, abducting girls, and procuring or attempting to procure any girl under the age of 21 for trafficking for prostitution. The maximum punishment for these offenses is imprisonment for up to 5 years. There is no military conscription in Tonga.

Human Rights Reports » 2006 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 6, 2007

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78793.htm

[accessed 31 December 2010]

WOMEN - Prostitution is not illegal, but activities such as soliciting in a public place, procuring, operating a brothel, and trading in women are criminal offenses. During the year there was an increase in prostitution for men from foreign fishing vessels, especially among women under the age of 18.

The Protection Project - Tonga [DOC]

The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), The Johns Hopkins University

www.protectionproject.org/human_rights_reports/report_documents/tonga.doc

[accessed 2009]

FORMS OF TRAFFICKING - Child sex tourism and prostitution appear to be increasing in the Pacific region in general, and anecdotal evidence suggests that child prostitution is emerging in Tonga in particular.

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Torture in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Tonga]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Tonga]  [other countries]