Torture in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
 

Child Prostitution

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                        gvnet.com/childprostitution/Sudan.htm

Republic of Sudan

Until the second half of 2008, Sudan's economy boomed on the back of increases in oil production, high oil prices, and large inflows of foreign direct investment.

Agricultural production remains important, because it employs 80% of the work force and contributes a third of GDP. The Darfur conflict, the aftermath of two decades of civil war in the south, the lack of basic infrastructure in large areas, and a reliance by much of the population on subsistence agriculture ensure much of the population will remain at or below the poverty line for years despite rapid rises in average per capita income.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Description: Sudan

CAUTION:  The following links and accompanying text have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Sudan.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated, misleading or even false.   No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

Sudanese children abducted for fighting and sex-UN

Reuters, Geneva, 8 Jun 8 2007

www.reuters.com/article/idUSL0817452320070608

[accessed 26 December 2010]

It voiced concern that "abductions of children continue to occur for forced recruitment, forced labour, and in some instances, sexual exploitation, especially in Darfur and South Sudan".

The committee also had information that children may resort to prostitution or be forced into early marriages as "a means for survival in exchange of food, money or basic goods".  – htsccp

 

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Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61594.htm

[accessed 25 December 2010]

CHILDREN – Child prostitution, trafficking of children, and sexual abuse of children remained problems, particularly in the South. Children engaged in prostitution for survival, usually without third-party involvement.

Concluding Observations Of The Committee On The Rights Of The Child (CRC)

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 4 October 2002

www1.umn.edu/humanrts/crc/sudan2002.html

[accessed 25 December 2010]

[65] The Committee is concerned at increasing instances of sexual exploitation of children, including through prostitution.

[66] The Committee recommends that the State party strengthen its efforts to address the sexual exploitation of children.

Sudanese children abducted for fighting and sex-UN

Reuters, Geneva, 8 Jun 8 2007

www.reuters.com/article/idUSL0817452320070608

[accessed 26 December 2010]

It voiced concern that "abductions of children continue to occur for forced recruitment, forced labour, and in some instances, sexual exploitation, especially in Darfur and South Sudan".

The committee also had information that children may resort to prostitution or be forced into early marriages as "a means for survival in exchange of food, money or basic goods".  – htsccp

Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children - Middle East/North Africa region

Based on the situation analysis written by Dr Najat M’jid for the Arab-African Forum against Commercial Sexual Exploitation, Rabat, Morocco, 24-26 October 2001 -- Source document (in French): Rapport sur la situation de l’exploitation sexuelle des enfants dans la région MENA, 10 septembre 2001

www.unicef.org/events/yokohama/backgound8.html

[accessed 25 July 2011]

These countries also have in common, however, a number of constraints that have hindered preparation of national plans of action. In all the countries of the region, there is cultural resistance to addressing the problem because the subject is largely taboo.

UNICEF Sudan Ratifies Two Protocols for the Protection of Children’s Rights

United Nations Children's Fund UNICEF, Khartoum/Geneva/New York, 31 October 2004

www.unicef.org/media/media_24003.html

[accessed 25 July 2011]

UNICEF welcomed today the ratification by the President of Sudan, Omar el-Bashir, of two UN Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of Child. The Optional Protocols aim at strengthening the protection of children from recruitment into armed forces and from sexual exploitation. Sudan joins more than 70 other countries worldwide that have ratified both Optional Protocols. Sudan is amongst the first Arab countries to do so.

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Torture in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Sudan]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Sudan]  [other countries]