Torture in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
 

Child Prostitution

The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

In the early years of the 21st Century                                                            gvnet.com/childprostitution/Senegal.htm

Republic of Senegal

After seeing its economy contract by 2.1% in 1993, Senegal made an important turnaround, thanks to the reform program, with real growth in GDP averaging over 5% annually during 1995-2008. Annual inflation had been pushed down to the single digits.

High unemployment, however, continues to prompt illegal migrants to flee Senegal in search of better job opportunities in Europe.  [The World Factbook, U.S.C.I.A. 2009]

Senegal

CAUTION:  The following links and accompanying text have been culled from the web to illuminate the situation in Senegal.  Some of these links may lead to websites that present allegations that are unsubstantiated, misleading or even false.   No attempt has been made to validate their authenticity or to verify their content.

*** FEATURED ARTICLE ***

ECPAT: CSEC in West Africa

ECPAT International Newsletters, Issue No : 34  1/March/2001

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 17 July 2011]

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS - Child prostitution is inextricably linked to socio-economic difficulties and child labour where young children are forced to work and/or prostitute themselves to provide for the family. Other reasons behind the increase in CSEC in the region are urbanisation, high illiteracy rates, early and forced marriage, unemployment, low status of women in the society, consumerism, civil conflict and tourism.

SEX TOURISM - Senegal is a major tourist destination with seven to eight months of peak tourist season. According to UNICEF Senegal, sex tourism has emerged as a new phenomenon. Boy prostitution is said to be on the increase, and children of both sexes harass tourists in the bid to lure clients.

 

*** ARCHIVES ***

UNICEFSenegal

www.unicef.org/infobycountry/senegal.html

[accessed 17 July 2011]

The Department of Labor’s 2004 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

U.S. Dept of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs, 2005

www.dol.gov/ilab/media/reports/iclp/tda2004/senegal.htm

[accessed 21 December 2010]

INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF CHILD LABOR - There are reports of Gambian girls working in the Senegalese sex industry. Senegalese girls are reported to work in Gambia in conditions of sexual exploitation, and some who go for domestic service become vulnerable to commercial sexual exploitation.

Human Rights Reports » 2005 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

U.S. Dept of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 8, 2006

www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2005/61589.htm

[accessed 21 December 2010]

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS - During the year the government arrested, prosecuted, and convicted traffickers. During the year there were prosecutions for rape, pedophilia, prostitution, and abuse of talibé children; however, there was no system to regularly collect statistics on cases. The human rights commissioner and the family ministry were the government's coordinators on human trafficking issues.

Young girls from both urban and rural areas were involved in prostitution, which NGOs claimed involved an adult pimp to facilitate commercial sex transactions or provide shelter.

Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) - 2006 [DOC]

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, 29 September 2006

www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/898586b1dc7b4043c1256a450044f331/b10f8e9681275570c125722d002cef25/$FILE/G0644838.doc

[accessed 21 December 2010]

[64] The Committee welcomes the efforts made to sensitize and protect children against sexual exploitation.  However, the Committee is concerned at the lack of:

(a)  Data on sexual exploitation, including sex tourism and trafficking in children to the State party;

(b)   Protection and/or recovery assistance for children victims of sexual exploitation;

(c)   Legislation to protect children from sexual exploitation including sex tourism; and

(d)   Implementation of existing legislation e.g. the rule prohibiting sexual intercourse with a girl under the age of 12 (Penal Code, art. 300).

Five Years After Stockholm [PDF]

ECPAT: Fifth Report on implementation of the Agenda for Action

ECPAT International, November 2001

www.no-trafficking.org/content/web/05reading_rooms/five_years_after_stockholm.pdf

[accessed 13 September 2011]

[B] COUNTRY UPDATES – SENEGAL – CSEC is now recognized as a problem in Senegal and the phenomenon is on the increase. Incidents of pedophilia are on the increase and there are frequent reports of it in the local press. According to DCI Senegal, over 400,000 children in Senegal are living under extremely difficult circumstances. Over 50% of them are engaged in dangerous activities like begging and hawking and are very vulnerable to CSEC. Some parents encourage their children into begging and prostitution. According to UNICEF, sex tourism has also emerged as a problem.

ECPAT: CSEC in West Africa

ECPAT International Newsletters, Issue No : 34  1/March/2001

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 17 July 2011]

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS - Child prostitution is inextricably linked to socio-economic difficulties and child labour where young children are forced to work and/or prostitute themselves to provide for the family. Other reasons behind the increase in CSEC in the region are urbanisation, high illiteracy rates, early and forced marriage, unemployment, low status of women in the society, consumerism, civil conflict and tourism.

SEX TOURISM - Senegal is a major tourist destination with seven to eight months of peak tourist season. According to UNICEF Senegal, sex tourism has emerged as a new phenomenon. Boy prostitution is said to be on the increase, and children of both sexes harass tourists in the bid to lure clients.

ECPAT: Trafficking in Children for Sexual Purposes

ECPAT International, November 2000 -- Looking Back Thinking Forward  - The fourth report on the implementation of the Agenda for Action adopted at the World Congress against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children held in Stockholm, Sweden, August 1996

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 18 September 2011]

WEST AFRICA - In Senegal, girls from the Southern Cassamance region, where a guerrilla war is going on, go to work as domestics in neighboring Gambia where they are very vulnerable to CSEC. There is also a huge in-country trafficking from rural to urban cities in the region. These children are trafficked to serve as domestics but end up trapped in the circle of prostitution. Some are trafficked mainly for prostitution in the urban areas.

UNICEF: Study On The Sexual Abuse And Exploitation Of Children In The Gambia [DOC]

Dr. Yankuba Kassama, Secretary of State for Health and Social Welfare, The Gambia, December 2003

www.unicef.org/media/files/gambia_report.doc

At one time this article had been archived and may possibly still be accessible [here]

[accessed 17 July 2011]

CHAPTER 2 - There is nearly universal agreement among varied informants that children engaged in prostitution around the Senegambia Tourist Area near Banjul are predominantly underage, many as young as 12 and that 60% to 70% of tourists come here for the sun, relaxation and cheap sex.

All material used herein reproduced under the fair use exception of 17 USC § 107 for noncommercial, nonprofit, and educational use.  PLEASE RESPECT COPYRIGHTS OF COMPONENT ARTICLES.  Cite this webpage as: Patt, Prof. Martin, "Child Prostitution - Senegal", http://gvnet.com/childprostitution/Senegal.htm, [accessed <date>]

 

 

Torture in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Human Trafficking in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Street Children in  [Senegal]  [other countries]
Child Prostitution in  [Senegal]  [other countries]